Kona Kampachi in Cognac Cream Sauce

Since my wife has no appetite for fish at the moment, I was alone in tackling that whole Kona Kampachi that Kona Blue had so generously sent my way. I had actually been eating fish for four days straight until I had finished it (I couldn’t dare put that wonderful fish in the freezer), but I thought I’d give you, readers a break from fish for a while, hence the gap from the other Kona Kampachi dishes I’d prepared. So here we are, the very last of my fish. This is a simple and straightforward preparation, the Kona Kampachi is sautéed in butter and topped with a cognac cream sauce.

Since I’d tried this fish cooked in many forms (raw, marinated/”chemically” cooked, and broiled), I thought I… click to read more…

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Sweet Sesame Broiled Kona Kampachi

Having enjoyed two different raw preparations of my Kona Kampachi recently, I thought it was time to explore how this fish cooks. Being a Hawaiian fish, my first inclination was to aim for something Polynesian in nature, but then I drifted towards Asian flavors. I also wanted to give this fish a good sear, but not cook much beyond medium-rare. Combining these two ideas, I decided on a sweet, spicy, light sauce to glaze the fish during its brief vacation under the broiler.

I was inspired by one of my favorite Asian food bloggers take on this fish, so I thought I’d try to take that idea in another direction. This glaze had distinct Asian flavors (to speak in such broad strokes. I… click to read more…

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Kona Kampachi Ceviche

As I’d mentioned, I was very fortunate to receive a very generous gift from the kind folks at Kona Blue, so as promised, I thought I’d share with you all the ways I put this delicious fish to good use. Today, I opted for another raw preparation of this sushi-grade, tender, fish that really lets it shine: ceviche.

Also known as “cebiche” and “seviche,” the idea to this dish is simple: high quality, fresh fish, “cooked,” but without heat. Instead, you chemically cook the fish by employing a brief bath of acidic marinade composed of citrus. Each country in Latin America puts their own twist on this, but essentially you have a seafood salad where the fish becomes tender and takes on the flavors of the marinade… click to read more…

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Kona Kampachi Sushi…and big news!

Food blogging has its perks. Aside from being a member of a surprisingly tightly knit community of really great people, every now and then, you might even chance upon some pretty awesome freebies. In this case, I really hit it lucky, and won a free fish (yay!). This is not just any fish–this is a Kona Kampachi from Kona Blue. I was pretty excited because this is very fresh and sushi-grade to boot, so the first thing that came to mind for me: sushi! (I’m so original! Good thing they don’t call it “ice cream grade”–you’d still stick with me, right, reader?) I’m not sure why, but making sushi is one of those things that always scared the hell out of me, so this was a biggie for me.

First, a bit more about the fish. I’d… click to read more…

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Grilled Shark with Pebre Sauce

The reaction I get to this dish when I mention it is “wait, did you say shark?” Yup, shark. I was compelled to try it when I saw it on sale because shark meat was new to me and I’m always up for something new. I wasn’t quite sure what it would be like, so I opted for some strong, South American flavors–a spicy, orange marinade before the shark hit the grill and a zesty cousin of chimichurri sauce: pebre sauce!

Unfortunately, I was pretty disappointed by shark and won’t be in any rush to have it again (but I’ll still happily watch them). If you’ve never had it either, it’s dense and more “meat”-like in texture compared to fish–not at all delicate or flaky (even compared to the density of swordfish). It has a very mild flavor, only slightly reminiscent of fish, but really, it’s quite bland. I do think this… click to read more…

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Salt Encrusted Yellowtail Snapper

I’m never too excited about baking fish–fish in the oven usually means a smelly kitchen in my mind. Then there’s this concept of salt crusting fish. Maybe you’ve heard of it before–you start with a whole fish, cover it all over with a thick layer of salt (yes, its a lot of salt), and bake it. The way it works is the salt forms a hard crust while the fish cooks inside (stuffed with various aromatics), retaining a tremendous deal of moisture and yielding incredibly tender, delicious fish that quite simply highlights the inherent flavors of great fresh fish. I thought I’d give this a shot and made Salt Encrusted Yellowtail Snapper.

Now you might have gathered from my tone that I approached this dish with a bit of skepticism and hesitation. If you’ve never had it, reviewing the ingredient list certainly doesn’t suggest anything super exciting–if anything, it almost sounds bland and boring. Not to mention this tremendous… click to read more…

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